ODOR DEFENSE

GIVING BACK TO FIGHT CHILDREN'S CANCER




Our company is committed to donating half the proceeds from your purchase of ODOR DEFENSE™ air filters to children's organizations, like St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, that are dedicated to finding cures for this scourge, called cancer.

If you are going to be ordering an air filter anyway, why not make it ODOR DEFENSE™. It's the best filter you can get for you and your family, and at the same time you will be helping the fight against children's cancer. ODOR DEFENSE comes in all sizes. If you want to find out more about this great filter, please click here ODOR DEFENSE.

As you will read below, harmful gases in the environment are believed to be a contributing factor in the development of cancer. Our ODOR DEFENSE™ air filter can help capture some of these harmful gases.
But, we want to do more to save our children.


Our company is committed to donating half the proceeds from your purchase of ODOR DEFENSE™ air filters to children's organizations, like St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, that are dedicated to finding cures for this scourge, called cancer
.


FACT: Nearly 16,000 children will be diagnosed with cancer each year.


"We were devastated when we were told our 4-year-old niece was diagnosed with stage 3 cancer. For us it was disbelief, followed by fear. For her it was physical and mental suffering, chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and countless medical treatments. Thankfully, she made it through the ordeal and is with us today. But, so many other children don't make it."

It is so sad to see someone suffering from cancer, especially when it is a child.

Cancer rates continue to rise among children. This cannot be allowed. We need to do all we can to reverse this trend. Many of these cases are due to environmental factors. Listen to what Catherine Metayer, MD, PhD had to say:

“When you see an increase like that (in cancer) -- that fast -- in a short period of time, most likely it is going to be driven by some exposure to environmental factors,” says Catherine Metayer, MD, PhD, an adjunct professor at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health."

“In the environment, a lot of things have changed. A lot of chemicals have been brought in. We are all exposed to many of them. So most likely the increase has been driven by some exposure to environmental factors, combined with genetics,” she says